Monthly Archives: April 2016

Keep in Mind Why You Are Here

– by Dani Stuckle

The above blog title is the phrase that confronted me on a daily basis for three weeks in November, 2015. It was a phrase added to the back of our name tags so while everyone else in the room could be reminded what our name was, the most was made of the blank page facing us. Keep in Mind Why You Are Here. Marianne Sheline, the Program Specialist at the Indiana Historical Society, thought it was a nice idea to try out on our class. It had such an impact on me that I added it to the wall of my cubicle so I can be reminded frequently that I need to reflect.

Mind

The “here” that I’m trying to be mindful of varies. Why am I in my current position? Why am I with this particular organization? Why am I serving on this committee? Why am I only at this stage of the project? This seemingly simple directive has given me countless opportunities to think about my career, my life, and who I want to be when I grow up.

Throughout the time I was in Indianapolis, I was forced to think time and again if we, as a profession, are really doing the best work we could be doing. Are we relevant to our communities? Are we connecting with people over meaningful work? What ideas can we take from other fields to make cultural organizations resonate with our audiences? I thank Marianne, and everyone else involved in making this seminar happen annually, for giving me so many things to continue thinking about.

Danielle “Dani” Stuckle
Educational Programs and Outreach Coordinator
State Historical Society of North Dakota

What is SHA?

 

Greetings from Nashvegas where it’s a beautiful spring sunny day. Why am I at work then?

Well, it’s to remind you that we’re hosting a free webinar next week for those curious about Developing History Leaders @SHA. The link (which I got wrong on the last email to you but I SWEAR is correct this time) is http://resource.aaslh.org/view/what-is-developing-leaders-sha/.

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In this webinar, you’ll hear from SHA graduates Richard Josey (Class of 2008) of the Minnesota Historical Society and Melissa Prycer (Class of 2013) of Dallas Heritage Village and faculty member David Young of Cliveden on the basics of this longstanding leadership program.

Our goal is to answer some of the following questions about this three-week program, the longest running professional development seminar in the history field:

  • Is SHA right for you?
  • How has SHA affected graduates in their careers?
  • What actually happens at SHA?
  • How do you apply and how many applicants are accepted?

The link to the webinar, including registration information is here: http://resource.aaslh.org/view/what-is-developing-leaders-sha/.

 

If you have questions about SHA or the webinar, please email me.

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